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Henderson County camps bring $120 million to area

Sunday, April 15th, 2012

Jane Cox Murray, executive director of the N.C. Youth Camp Association, speaks during Business Morning Update Wednesday at The Chariot in downtown Hendersonville.

PhotoLeigh Kelley/Times-News

By
Times-News Staff Writer
Published: Wednesday, April 11, 2012 at 5:34 p.m.
Youth camps have a significant and positive economic impact on Henderson County, a 2010 N.C. State University study found, as the county pulled in $120 million from its 17 camps.

Facts

Total economic impact findings by county

Henderson – $120 million from 17 camps

Transylvania – $126 million from 14 camps

Buncombe – $103 million from 7 camps

Jackson – $11.5 million from 2 camps

Jane Murray, executive director of the N.C. Youth Camp Association, said that in Transylvania County, $126 million was generated from 14 camps, and in Buncombe County, seven camps brought $103 million to the local economy.

The 10-week study conducted by N.C. State looked at 45 camps in Henderson, Transylvania and Buncombe counties, as well as two in Jackson County.

The estimated impact in the four Western North Carolina counties is about $365 million, Murray said.

She shared this data at Wednesday’s Business Morning Update at The Chariot in Hendersonville.

“Camp is part of the culture and is the life of the community,” Murray said.

In 2010, Murray said 13,053 families visited Henderson County when bringing their children to the camps. These families stayed an average of four nights in the county’s lodging facilities and spent about $2,300 each on shopping, dining and visiting nature areas and historic attractions.

In addition, 1,181 seasonal camp employees spend an average of $3,858 each during their stay in Henderson County.

The last economic impact study was conducted in 1999 and showed that camps in Western North Carolina generated about $96 million. The 2010 study indicated a 279 percent increase from 11 years before.

The latest survey included 53,238 families and 5,477 seasonal workers throughout the four counties.

The N.C. Youth Camp Association has 50 member camps in the state. For more information, visit www.nccamps.org.

Reach Schulman at 828-694-7890 or mark.schulman@blueridgenow.com.

Asheville area camps add local food to their menus

Tuesday, July 5th, 2011

Striving for healthier menus, summer camps have one eye on sustainability

Written by Jessica Kennedy, Ashville Citizen-Times
Terra Summer camp director and founder Sybil Fix watches as students, from left, Keira Van Hanken, Abby Smith, William Coye and Matt Young help make a blueberry peach crumble at the camp in Mills River. / John Fletcher/

Terra Summer camp director and founder Sybil Fix watches as students, from left, Keira Van Hanken, Abby Smith, William Coye and Matt Young help make a blueberry peach crumble at the camp in Mills River. / John Fletcher/

ASHEVILLE — Every summer camp is different, and the food they feed their campers varies just as widely.

But many area camps are making efforts to provide fresh, local, healthy food for their campers to make camps more sustainable as a whole.

Terra Summer, a food-based day program in Mills River, educates children about food through food.

“Children are our future adults,” said Sybil Fix, founder and director of Terra Summer. “They’re the people who are going to be living on this planet for the next one year to 90 years.”

The children who attend Terra Summer work in the 16-acre on-site organic farm, work with a chef to cook their lunch each day, and have instructional time. Terra Summer uses only vegetables grown in its garden, very few animal products and no processed foods. The program is entirely vegetarian.

“We try to teach children about the healthfulness of food more through a discussion of the whole holistic approach to food rather than lecturing them about calories,” Fix said.

Denise Barratt, a registered dietitian in Asheville, said using local and fresh foods is a healthier option because kids will be more willing to eat them for taste and aesthetics.

“It has more flavor,” Barratt said. “It’s more attractive because it’s fresh from the garden. If you go to the tailgate market, you can get something picked that day rather than several weeks ago.”

The ‘picky’ problem

Exposing kids to a range of different foods is the key to making them less picky, Barratt said.

Hans Stader, of Asheville, said he signed his son up for the program for the last two summers because he “needed some more exposure to different foods.”

“We’re still waiting for him to grow up,” Stader said. “He’s a very picky eater.”

Stader said Terra Summer introduced his son to new foods and ideas and planted seeds in his mind that he hopes will flourish over time.

“There’s a stereotype of kid-friendly having to be what looks familiar to kids, but it’s very possible to introduce things to kids that they’ll eat,” said Genie Gunn, volunteer standards chair for the American Camp Association’s southeastern branch. “Camps just need to make a commitment to do it.”

Residential camps

Camp Carolina of Brevard and Camp Ridgecrest of Black Mountain have also been moving toward more sustainable camp models for their residential camp programs.

“We’ve been getting local food for about 17 years, but it’s easier now in the last couple years to get better food,” said Alfred Thompson, owner and director at Camp Carolina. “It’s still not easy, it’s just easier.”

Thompson is part of a community supported agriculture program and gets two cases of local, organic vegetables every week for his campers. It doesn’t feed the whole camp, but it helps, he said. He also recommends taking trips to the farmer’s market and purchases flour from a North Carolina mill.

Camp Carolina tries to add healthy options to established kid favorites — meals like pizza, tacos and spaghetti.

“Kids tend to like finger foods,” Barratt said. “Kids will go for raw broccoli or carrots or cauliflower to put in a ranch dip rather than squash casserole.”

But Thompson has figured out his own way to get campers to eat vegetables. The pasta Bolognese, for example, has carrots and celery ground up in it, and the pasta Raphael has blended artichoke hearts.

“They don’t like to see the vegetables,” Thompson said.

Quality and price

“The stereotype is that it’s more expensive, but the yield is greater,” Gunn said. “There’s going to be a lot less waste because it’s fresher and tastes better.”

Gunn said it can be more expensive up front to hire skilled food service people and buy organic or local vegetables. But after the initial commitment, camps will find that it’s not that expensive.

“The impact is that a camper might go home and try to eat those things or increase the fruits and vegetables they take to school with them to augment their lunches,” Gunn said. “It also makes them more open to the changes we all hope are coming down the pipe for public schools.”

Barratt said the positive economic impact on the community from camps buying local food is huge. While one piece of produce may cost slightly more, the money that goes into the local economy adds up.

“It doesn’t have to be all or nothing,” Barratt said.

“The side effect is that if the food’s healthier at the camp, it’s going to help the child that week.”

Residential camps

Camp Carolina of Brevard and Camp Ridgecrest of Black Mountain have also been moving toward more sustainable camp models for their residential camp programs.

“We’ve been getting local food for about 17 years, but it’s easier now in the last couple years to get better food,” said Alfred Thompson, owner and director at Camp Carolina. “It’s still not easy, it’s just easier.”

Thompson is part of a community supported agriculture program and gets two cases of local, organic vegetables every week for his campers. It doesn’t feed the whole camp, but it helps, he said. He also recommends taking trips to the farmer’s market and purchases flour from a North Carolina mill.

Camp Carolina tries to add healthy options to established kid favorites — meals like pizza, tacos and spaghetti.

“Kids tend to like finger foods,” Barratt said. “Kids will go for raw broccoli or carrots or cauliflower to put in a ranch dip rather than squash casserole.”

But Thompson has figured out his own way to get campers to eat vegetables. The pasta Bolognese, for example, has carrots and celery ground up in it, and the pasta Raphael has blended artichoke hearts.

“They don’t like to see the vegetables,” Thompson said.

Quality and price

“The stereotype is that it’s more expensive, but the yield is greater,” Gunn said. “There’s going to be a lot less waste because it’s fresher and tastes better.”

Gunn said it can be more expensive up front to hire skilled food service people and buy organic or local vegetables. But after the initial commitment, camps will find that it’s not that expensive.

“The impact is that a camper might go home and try to eat those things or increase the fruits and vegetables they take to school with them to augment their lunches,” Gunn said. “It also makes them more open to the changes we all hope are coming down the pipe for public schools.”

Barratt said the positive economic impact on the community from camps buying local food is huge. While one piece of produce may cost slightly more, the money that goes into the local economy adds up.

“It doesn’t have to be all or nothing,” Barratt said.

“The side effect is that if the food’s healthier at the camp, it’s going to help the child that week.”

Ton-A-Wandah sends area businesses to camp

Friday, May 20th, 2011

Chris Conard takes part in Camp Field Day at Camp Ton-A-Wandah Thursday. Team and individuals competed in events like archery, 22 rifle shooting, kayaking, rock climbing, table tennis and more.

Chris Conard takes part in Camp Field Day at Camp Ton-A-Wandah Thursday. Team and individuals competed in events like archery, 22 rifle shooting, kayaking, rock climbing, table tennis and more.

Buy Photo PATRICK SULLIVAN/TIMES-NEWS

By Jessica Goodman
Times-News Staff Writer

Published: Friday, May 13, 2011 at 4:30 a.m.

FLAT ROCK — Chris Conard released the arrow from his bow, sending it soaring toward the target at the end of the field. It struck solidly in the blue with a whack.

There was a lot of backslapping and friendly competition Thursday as bankers, directors and managers climbed towers, paddled kayaks or shot arrows at the second Camp Field Day on Thursday at Camp Ton-A-Wandah in Flat Rock. The event is held to educate area businesses about the impact of the region’s camp industry.

“There’s some good healthy competition between businesses,” said Ton-A-Wandah Camp Director Garrett Graham. “This gives businesses opportunity to experience camp.”

“Basically, there is no other event like this,” said Fair Waggoner, city president of United Community Bank and organizer of Camp Field Day.

Teams from 19 businesses competed in camp activities such as riflery, archery, rock climbing, ping-pong, cornhole, canoeing and horseback riding. The day ended with the traditional campfire and s’mores.

“Camp season is fast approaching,” said Bob Williford, president of the Henderson County Chamber of Commerce. “This is our opportunity to communicate the benefits of camp, both socially and economically.”

A recent economic impact study on Western North Carolina camps, conducted by N.C. State University and commissioned by the N.C. Youth Camp Association, found the camp industry has a total impact of $365 million each year in Henderson, Transylvania, Buncombe and Jackson counties.

Camp Field Day allowed camp owners and employees to network with other businesses, and served as a team-building event.  The event also included a raffle to benefit the Henderson County Youth Leadership Program, which has helped 22 local students have full scholarships to 14 summer camps in the area.

“I’m here because it’s good to join the corporate world and the camping world to have an impact on children,” said Yates Pharr, co-owner of Falling Creek Camp outside Tuxedo. “Also, it’s fun.”

The event raises awareness for the Young Leaders program, added Paige Hafner, executive director for the program.

WNC residents speak up about state regulation

Sunday, April 17th, 2011

Legislative panel listens to public’s concerns, support for current rules

By Jessica Goodman Staff Writer
Hendersonville Times-News

Published: Saturday, April 16, 2011 at 4:30 a.m.

FLAT ROCK — About 120 people from Western North Carolina addressed legislators from the General Assembly Friday about state regulations they felt should be eliminated, maintained or strengthened. People began lining up at noon to sign up to speak, and the meeting went over its allotted time by an hour.

The General Assembly’s joint regulatory reform committee held the meeting Friday in the Bo Thomas Auditorium at Blue Ridge Community College. The committee was created earlier this year, charged with working to “create a strong environment for private sector job creation by lifting the undue burden imposed by outdated, unnecessary and vague rules,” according to the resolution that created the committee.

Friday’s meeting was the fifth of six meetings held across the state to hear citizens’ concerns. Topics included concerns about the impact of deregulation on the environment and child services, while farmers and small business owners were concerned about the impact of too much or outdated regulation and inefficient government departments.

“We take this seriously. We’ve learned a lot over the last week,” said Sen. David Rouzer, R-Johnston, co-chair of the committee.

Gibbie Harris, health director for Buncombe County, urged legislators to balance the necessity of regulations with the needs of businesses.

“There are rules on the books that are really good for us, but there are also rules that are outdated,” he said.

Speakers concerned about deregulation urged the legislators to “use a scalpel, not a meat ax” when looking at regulations concerning water and air quality, and health issues. They said regulations protect the natural heritage of Western North Carolina as well as the health of people in the area. Speakers also urged the legislators to continue to fund the N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources in order to continue protecting the waterways.

“Our economy is tied to our natural heritage,” said David Weintraub, executive director of the Environmental and Conservation Organization in Henderson County.

Farmers and small business owners spoke about how regulations hurt business.

Regulations force business owners to spend more time on paperwork and inside government offices. Farmers said different departments with DENR will conduct inspections of their farms, which is inefficient and unnecessary.

Bob Williford, president of the Henderson County Chamber of Commerce, told legislators the primary goal of businesses was to stay in business, and owners can get weighed down by the “myriad of local, state and federal regulations.” He suggested they be streamlined — with antiquated regulations being eliminated. He added the major complaints from business owners that he hears involve the timeliness of responses from government agencies.

Small farmers sought the protection of agriculture in the area, adding that committees regulating agriculture should include people with an agriculture background.

Other issues brought before the legislators included preserving child care regulations in the state. Speakers expressed concern about how deregulation measuring quality child care centers would negatively impact their children.

Legislators attending the meeting also included Rep. Chuck McGrady, R-Hendersonville, committee co-chair Sen. Harry Brown, R-Onslow, and Rep. Roger West, R-Marble.

The statewide committee meetings began March 11 in Wilmington. The committee also has visited Charlotte, Jamestown and Winterville. The committee will meet next Thursday in Raleigh. For more information, visit www.ncleg.net/regreform.

Rituals of Summer Camp

Tuesday, April 5th, 2011

tradition

 This article appeeared in Asheville Citizen Times on March 1, 2011, Written by Rachel Connor, WNC Parent contributor

Some of the oldest and most unique summer camps in the Southeast rest in the mountains of Western North Carolina. From tribes to uniforms to family-style meals, they are steeped in tradition. “Each one of us has a strength that makes us different from our neighbor,” Keystone’s Camp director, Page Ives Lemel, said. “So, we are [all] able to continue to be successful.”

Keystone Camp

The oldest camp in the region began when Florence Ellis and Fannie Holt transported a group of Florida girls to the Carolina mountains for the summer of 1916. Three years later, Ellis and Holt decided to make Brevard the permanent home for Keystone Girls Camp. The camp has remained in Ellis’ family for four generations; Lemel is the great-great niece of Ellis.

Horseback riding is a central characteristic in Keystone’s program, and it has been an activity since the foundation of the camp. Holt was probably the horse rider, Lemel said.

“Girls are classified by ability level when they get to camp,” Lemel said. “Every level we have something to offer the child, by riding every day…they make substantial progress.”

Camp Illahee

Brevard is also home to another camp where tradition is a trademark.

At Camp Illahee, every Sunday is a time of unity. From the way they dress to the songs they sing, the girls function as a community.

For the entire day, the campers and counselors wear Illahee-logoed white shirts and blue ties. The girls wear the uniforms during Sunday’s worship time, as well as when they eat and gather around the weekly campfire.

“Part of it [wearing the uniforms] is the worship service; it is nice to have everyone dressed alike,” co-director, Laurie Strayhorn, said. “It gives the camp a feeling of unity and makes it a special day…it is a fresh, unifying thing…and a noncompetitive environment.”

Another Sunday specialty occurs when lunch is served. The girls join together in singing the doxology “Praise God, From Whom All Blessings Flow” before sitting down to their customary Sunday meal, which always includes fried chicken, wild rice, rolls, broccoli and ice cream.

When Strayhorn first become co-camp director in 2002, she was unaware of the importance of Sunday’s traditions.

She substituted white rice for the wild rice one Sunday, and the next day a few campers wanted to talk to her about the importance of camp traditions. They told Strayhorn that they always had wild rice.

“Sometimes the things that you think are not a big deal are a big deal, and kids need to know that there are some things they can count on,” Strayhorn said.

Eagle’s Nest

Eagle’s Nest Camp, located in the Pisgah National Forest, is another site that uses mealtime to create a sense of community. For every meal of every day, the campers eat with their table family.

There are three boys, three girls and two counselors in every family, and the campers come from various age groups.

“It’s a very intentional, small community…and a wonderful way for staff members to check on the kids each day, three times a day,” Liz Snyder, assistant camp director said. “The table family becomes closer than the cabin community.”

Apart from their day-to-day camp life, Eagle’s Nest also has additional trips. One of the most popular picks is the Huck Finn adventure.

For seven days, a group of eight middle school-aged children drift down the French Broad River, reading Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” and reliving Huck’s rustic-inspired lifestyle.

“The counselor reads the book, and they recreate the experience,” Snyder said. “A homemade raft is already prepared, and the campers paint the raft [before floating on it].”

Gwynn Valley Camp

Kids at Gwynn Valley Camp, on the outskirts of Brevard, also learn to respect the environment, as the site produces approximately 70 percent of its own food.

Gwynn Valley grows over 20 varieties of vegetables on its farm. Campers who choose the farm as a program are allowed to help with the harvesting of the produce.

“They get to plant a little bit, but they get to harvest most everything,” director, Grant Bullard, said. “They really love the harvesting of the vegetables — digging potatoes, picking tomatoes and pulling up carrots.”

The farm also has cows and chickens that the children help to feed. The chickens yield a portion of the eggs needed at camp, and the cows are raised for beef.

Gwynn Valley’s green efforts surpass the arena of nutrition. The camp has a water-powered gristmill that provides electricity for half of the cabins. The mill was built in the late 1890s, and Gwynn Valley revived it in the 1980s. Bullard says the mill implants the idea of conservation into the campers.

“It is a vital part of the camp…it teaches kids where food comes from and also teaches the kids to be aware of lights [left] on and conserving electricity,” Bullard said. “It’s like a living part of history.”

The gristmill is also used to grind cornmeal and make tortilla flour. The leftovers from the mill are sent back to the farm to feed the chickens, and the corn cobs are used to make toys. “Nothing is wasted from that process,” Bullard said.

Gwynn Valley has always valued simplicity and a close relationship to the land. “We were green before we realized it,” he said.

Timberlake and Merri-Mac

Northwest of Gwynn Valley, Camp Timberlake and its sister site, Camp Merri-Mac, call Black Mountain home.

Both Timberlake and Merri-Mac divide campers into tribes. On the first day of camp, each boy at Timberlake becomes an Iroquois or a Seminole. Each girl at Merri-Mac becomes an Iroquois, Seminole or Choctaw.

Throughout the summer, the tribes compete in evening activities like water balloon games and capture the flag. The counselors keep a tally of each tribe’s victories, and at the end of the session, the winning team receives the prized camp banner and bragging rights.

“We recognize that there is going to be competition in life, and we want to give them a framework for it,” Dan Singletary, director of Timberlake, said. “Teaching [that] healthy competition is part of growing up.”

Campers can also mark individual success by their “skins.” Each boy or girl receives a hide branded with his/her tribe’s emblem. The skin is a record of each Indian’s achievements. Every time someone excels in an activity, he is awarded with a Bronze, Silver or Gold symbol that is attached to his skin.

The campers remain in the same tribe each year and bring back their skins to add to their previous accomplishments.

“We offer different types of success… [and] we recognize those achievements,” Singletary said. “If they learned a certain kind of knot or got a certain score in archery, they get recognized in some way.”

Falling Creek

Falling Creek Camp, in Tuxedo,ties traditions together with its Boy Scout merit badge program, in which campers can earn badges that are hard to achieve during the school year.

“We let them tell us what they’d like to pass off, and they bring the merit badge book, the sign off card and a plan of action,” director, Yates Pharr, said. “We introduce them to the counselor that can help them pass that off…it is a mutual responsibility.”

The camp’s traditional father-son weekends, offered before and after the summer camp sessions, focus on strengthening the relationship between a father and his son through adventure.

“For boys to be able to have a good, positive experience with their father…is really important,” Pharr said. “When you mix in adventure, you discuss things you wouldn’t normally discuss.”

Family is an essential part of this Falling Creek’s programs, as Pharr says, “We are a compliment to any family’s intentions to raise strong, young men.”

Update – Forest Service Proposed Temporary Use Permits for the Nantahala River

Friday, September 10th, 2010

Update -  Forest Service Proposed Temporary Use Permits for the Nantahala River 

Representatives of the North Carolina Youth Camp Association met with several Nantahala River outfitter guides just prior to the expiration of the comment period on the Forest Service’s proposal to issue temporary use permits to camps, school groups and other organizational users of the Nantahala River.  The hope is that the summer camps and the outfitter guides may jointly propose a solution to the recent impasse over summer camps access to the river for kayaking, canoeing, and rafting.    

The Forest Service extended the comment period on its proposal to September 17 from September 10.  No reason for the extension was given.

The Association gave conditional support to the temporary use permit proposal in its comments on the Forest Service proposal.   While supportive of the proposal because it would allow summer camps that currently do not have a permit to get one, the Association felt that restrictions on the number of boats and on the time a camp could stay on the river did not reflect the camps’ current usage.

“The Forest Service’s proposal is a step in the right direction,” said Chuck McGrady, the Association’s Executive Director.  “However, there are a number of ways that summer camps might regain their historical access to the river, and we’re open to discuss any proposals that might treat all summer camps the same.”

Three NCYCA summer camps - Camp Rockbrook, Eagles’ Nest Camp, and Camp Highlander – currently have permits which date back to when the current permit system was instituted in the 1980’s.  The majority of summer camps that use the river, however, do not have permits and currently have to use an outfitter guide to get access for their paddling programs.

Senator Richard Burr’s office has been working with the Association to reach an equitable solution to the river access issue.  The Forest Service has indicated that any new user permits would be issued early next year.

Chuck McGrady goes to Raleigh!

Tuesday, August 10th, 2010

Our own, Chuck McGrady, will join the North Carolina General Assembly as one of its freshman members when it convenes on January 26, 2011.   He is currently a Henderson County Commissioner, but qualified for the legislative position and drew no opposition.  Thus, his election is virtually assured.

Having been Falling Creek Camp’s owner and director for the better part of twenty years and been active in the camp community and with the American Camp Association on public policy issues, McGrady says he expects to remain interested in issues which affect summer camps.

“I’m interested in working on a better school calendar law and also understand how building and health codes sometimes don’t allow camps to operate in the manner they’ve operated for decades.  While I’m going to miss working with the Association, I suspect I’ll be more valuable to the summer camps by being in the General Assembly than I can be working as their lobbyist.”

McGrady is a long-time environmental advocate who has worked on a variety of public lands issues.  These issues are likely to also be of interest to the camp community.

McGrady has always pressed the summer camps to be involved in influencing public policy and that it will be really good to have someone with his background representing Henderson County, the home to many summer camps.

McGrady is not the first summer camp director to serve in the General Assembly.  Former Keystone Camp owner and director, Bill Ives, served from 1992-1998, representing Transylvania County, another county that has many summer camps.

NCYCA is currently in the process of searching out another Executive Director to fill McGrady’s position by late summer/ early fall.

Phase I of Economic Impact Study Nearing Completion

Thursday, April 15th, 2010

The beginning phase of the Economic Impact Study for resident camps in western North Carolina is nearing completion.  After our research team from NC State distributed the first set of surveys to the directors of camps located in the the four county study region (Buncombe, Henderson, Jackson and Transylvania counties), they have collected data from over 75% of those camps polled.  This participation surpasses the previous EIS performed in 1998. 

The EIS is examining and quantifying the contribution summer camps make to the economies of western North Carolina. The next phases of the study will take place during and following the summer camp sessions. The research team will distribute surveys to the parents of camp children and camp staff members. The study will be completed in early 2011.

Hats off! to all camp directors who completed these surveys.  We understand this was not an easy task, and we thank you for your time and efforts. Without your camps’ individual information, we would not be able to compile this valuable study.

NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY TO STUDY THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF SUMMER CAMPS IN WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA

Monday, March 1st, 2010
In partnership with the North Carolina Youth Camp Association and the American Camp Association, researchers at North Carolina State University have begun an economic impact study of summer camps in Western North Carolina. A similar study in 1998 showed camps in Buncombe, Jackson, Henderson and Transylvania counties generated nearly 100 million dollars for local communities. The new study will reflect current economic conditions and measure the economic importance of summer camps in the four-county region.  
 

Dr. Michelle Gacio Harrolle and Dr. Samantha Rozier-Rich of the Department of Parks, Recreation & Tourism Management at NC State University are leading the research. The study is collecting and tabulating the local economic activity of summer camps’ direct impact, as well as that of their employees and camper families who visit the area each summer. A final report will be presented in January 2011.

“We are confident the study will confirm what most business and community leaders already know: summer camps are vital to the economy of Western North Carolina. We want to provide actual data as evidence to community leaders, business leaders and elected officials,” said Chuck McGrady, Executive Director of the North Carolina Youth Camp Association.

Western North Carolina has one of the highest concentrations of organized camps in the United States. Erica Rohrbacher, the American Camp Association’s Southeastern Section Executive Director noted that this study will be invaluable to the camp community “There are approximately 55 summer camps in the four county area and we hope to get all of them to participate.”

The American Camp Association works to preserve, promote, and enhance the camp experience for children and adults. This is accomplished through the only nationwide accreditation program, through professional development, and through public awareness programs and public policy monitoring. ACA-accredited camp programs ensure children are provided with a diversity of educational and developmentally challenging learning opportunities. There are over 2,400 ACAaccredited camps that meet up to 300 health and safety standards nationwide.

The North Carolina Youth Camp Association is a trade association formed by North Carolina summer camps to expand public understanding of youth camps and to represent their interests with local, state and federal policymakers. The Association seeks to strengthen and expand the educational, environmental and recreational opportunities provided by North Carolina’s camps.

Contact:
Chuck McGrady (828) 692-3696
chuck@ncamps.org
 

Erica Rohrbacher (919) 402-4336
Erica@acasoutheastern.org